Statement of UN about anti-Roma manifestations in Bulgaria

5 10 2011

UN High Commissioner for Human Rights is deeply concerned about the anti-Roma demonstrations in Bulgaria since the 23 of September, when a Roma leader, called Kiril Rashkow was blamed of killing a 19 years old boy. Rupert Colville, the spokesperson for the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, has issued a statement in which he show concern about an entire community to be targeted for an offence allegedly committed by an individual. It is not the first time that there are problems with Roma community in UE. These kinds of situations, despite being rejected for the European Union institutions, are becoming more usual. For example, about one year ago, French government expelled the Romanian gypsy’s community of France. You can read the hole statement below:

4 October 2011

Spokesperson for the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights: Rupert Colville 

Location: Geneva 

Subject: Bulgaria

 

 

  We are deeply concerned about the anti-Roma demonstrations that  have  been occurring in Bulgaria  since 23 September, when an  ethnic Bulgarian  youth was run over and killed by a van reportedly  belonging to a local Roma.  The protests continued into this  past weekend, spreading to some 14  towns  across the country.  We regret the death of the young man in the village of Katunitsa. We  hope  that if the driver of the van is culpable, he will be brought to  justice in 
accordance with the law, and that through such a judicial  process, the facts  surrounding the young  man’s death will be clearly  established.
The hate speech that has been fuelling the anti-Roma  protests in Bulgaria is of great concern. It is unacceptable for an entire community to be targeted for  an offence allegedly committed by an individual. We call on Bulgarian authorities at the highest  political level to publicly restate this principle of individual criminal responsibility. The political leadership must take a strong stance against hate speech and ensure that police officers continue to be deployed in sufficient numbers to protect Roma neighbourhoods from threats of retribution and harassment. Recently, anti-Roma demonstrations have also taken place in Hungary and the Czech Republic. In all three countries, political parties with extreme nationalist views have reportedly seized the opportunity to stoke up anti-Roma prejudice. In such an atmosphere, inter-ethnic tensions rise, and Roma risk becoming scapegoats of broader dissatisfaction. Such hostility adds to the challenges which millions of Roma in Europe face in realisation of their economic, social and cultural rights, including education, health and, particularly, employment. We encourage the EU and European States to adopt and implement socially inclusive policies to end the long-standing discrimination against Roma communities in Europe.

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One response

11 10 2011
dpp090

I completely agree with that. Although when time of crisis come, the Roma community stands together, they are still EU citizens and have all the same rights as every other person and that discrimination in Bulgaria, Romania has to stop.

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